U.S. Social Movements Final Group Project

Final Projects, Projects

Guiding Questions:
1. How does unequal power and privilege impact our society?
2. How does oppression impact our lives and what have people/groups done to resist and transform them?

Enduring Understandings:
1. Where there is oppression, there is resistance.
2. People can work in solidarity to respond to oppression.
3. Social movements can empower people to act upon injustices and to transform their communities.

Learning Objectives:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Project Steps:
1. Research group’s chosen social movement/event via primary + secondary sources
Skills: research, read, annotate/take notes, fact-checking, checking for bias/subjective language
2. Write summary paragraphs + Works Cited
Skills: outline, summarize, in-text citations + works cited, use of Ethnic Studies vocabulary
3. Create Google Slides presentation to teach classmates about your social movement / event
Skills: Condense information to fit presentation format, consideration of audience, presentation practice,
collaboration, communication


Black Arts Movement (1965-1975):

The Black Arts Movement (BAM) was an African/African American-led art movement during the 1960s and 1970s that created new cultural institutions and conveyed a message of black pride through activism and art.

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Click on the image above to open up the group project.

Black Panther Party (1966-1982):

Originally the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, this Black Power political organization was founded by college students Bobby Seale and Huey Newton in Oakland, California.

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East LA Blowouts (March 1968):

More than 1000 Chicano students walk out of Abraham Lincoln High School in Los Angeles in protest of school conditions. The student strike known as the L.A. Blowouts, would later have over 10,000 high school students walk out by the end of the week.

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Click the image above to open up the group project.

King Assassination Riots (April 1968):

A wave of civil disturbance swept the U.S. following the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4th, 1968. Many believe it to be the greatest wave of social unrest the U.S. had experienced since the Civil War.

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Click the image above to open up the group project.

Asian American Political Alliance (May 1968):

Student organization formed at UC Berkeley. AAPA coined the term “Asian American.”

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American Indian Movement (July 1968):

Shortly after the Minneapolis Anishinaabeg formed an “Indian Patrol” to monitor police activities in Indian neighborhoods, Dennis Banks formed the American Indian Movement (AIM). AIM consisted mainly of urban Indigenous youth who believed that direct confrontation with the U.S. government is the only way to redress historical grievances and to gain contemporary civil rights.

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Third World Liberation Front Student Strike at SF State (Nov. 1968):

Students with the Third World Liberation Front at San Francisco State begin a five-month strike for a College of Ethnic Studies and other reforms. SFSU Third World Liberation Front was formed in March of 1968 with the Black Students Union, the Mexican American Student Confederation, the Philippine American Collegiate Endeavor (PACE), the Intercollegiate Chinese for Social Action (ICSA), the Latin American Students Organization, American Indian student organization, and the Asian American Political Alliance.

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Stonewall (June 1969):

The Stonewall Inn, a gay club and place of refuge for LGBT individuals, was raided by NYC police. Employees and patrons were hauled out and arrested, and their treatment sparked a riot and six days of protests among bar patrons and neighborhood residents. The Stonewall Riots served as a catalyst for the gay rights movement in the U.S. and around the world.

#1

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Click on the image above to open up the group project.

Alcatraz Indian Occupation (Nov. 1969):

78 Native American activists seize and occupy Alcatraz Island. The occupiers held the island for nearly eighteen months, from Nov. 20, 1969, until June 11, 1971, reclaiming it as Indian land and demanding fairness and respect for Indian people. Thousands of Native Americans in total participated in the occupation during those years.

Click on the image above to open up group project.
Click on the image above to open up the group project.

504 Sit-ins (1977 Protests):

People with disabilities and disability communities and allies occupied federal buildings in the U.S. in order to push for the issuance of long-delayed regulations regarding Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, allowing for the acknowledgement of civil rights of people with disabilities and regulations.

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